Y-90 Zevalin

Generic Name: ibritumomab (ib ri TYOO mo mab)Brand Names: In-111 Zevalin, Y-90 Zevalin

 

What is Y-90 Zevalin (ibritumomab)?

Ibritumomab is a protein that targets white blood cells in the body. When ibritumomab is attached to a radioactive chemical, the radiation is delivered directly to the tumor (lymphoma).

Ibritumomab is used in combination with other medicines to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Ibritumomab may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Y-90 Zevalin (ibritumomab)?

Do not receive this medication if you are pregnant. It could cause harm to the unborn baby. Use an effective form of birth control, and tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. Do not receive a "live" vaccine while you are being treated with ibritumomab, and avoid coming into contact with anyone who has recently received a live vaccine. There is a chance that the virus could be passed on to you.

Some people receiving ibritumomab have developed "secondary" bone marrow or blood cell cancers such as leukemia. Talk with your doctor about your individual risk while receiving this medication.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving Y-90 Zevalin (ibritumomab)?

You should not receive this medication if you are allergic to ibritumomab, or to radioactive chemicals or mouse proteins.

Before you receive ibritumomab, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • liver disease-
  • kidney disease-
  • any type of infection-

  • lung or breathing problems-

  • bleeding or blood clotting problems-

  • low platelet counts-

  • low blood pressure- or

  • a history of heart disease, heart attack, angina (chest pain), or irregular heart beats.

It is not known whether ibritumomab passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not receive ibritumomab without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Some people receiving ibritumomab have developed "secondary" bone marrow or blood cell cancers such as leukemia. Talk with your doctor about your individual risk while receiving this medication.

How is ibritumomab used?

Ibritumomab is used in combination with rituximab (Rituxan) and a radioactive chemical. Ibritumomab is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will give you this injection.

Ibritumomab is usually given every 7 to 9 days. Follow your doctor's instructions.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor if you miss an appointment for your ibritumomab injection.

What happens if I overdose?

Overdose symptoms may include weakness, pale skin, and easy bruising or bleeding.

What should I avoid while using Y-90 Zevalin (ibritumomab)?

Do not receive a "live" vaccine while you are being treated with ibritumomab, and avoid coming into contact with anyone who has recently received a live vaccine. There is a chance that the virus could be passed on to you.

Y-90 Zevalin (ibritumomab) side effects

Some people receiving an ibritumomab injection have had a reaction to the infusion (when the medicine is injected into the vein). Tell your caregiver right away if you feel dizzy, nauseated, light-headed, sweaty, itchy, or have a fast heartbeat, trouble breathing, chest pain or heavy feeling, or pain spreading to the arm or shoulder. These reactions can occur during the injection or within 24 hours afterward.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite-

  • anxiety-

  • dizziness- or

  • joint pain.

What other drugs will affect Y-90 Zevalin (ibritumomab)?

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with ibritumomab. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about ibritumomab.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.