Depressed Preschoolers Show Brain Changes, Scans Find
Medical news

 

A brain region that processes emotions works differently in preschoolers with depression than in those without the mental health disorder, a new study shows." />
MedicineNet.com
Slideshows
Slideshow Pictures
All Slideshows
Newest Slideshows
Pet Health Slideshows
Images
Image Collection
Allergic Skin Disorders
Bacterial Skin Diseases
Bites and Infestations
Diseases of Pigment
Fungal Skin Diseases
Medical Anatomy and Illustrations
Noncancerous, Precancerous & Cancerous Tumors
Oral Health Conditions
Papules, Scales, Plaques and Eruptions
Scalp, Hair and Nails
Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)
Vascular, Lymphatic and Systemic Conditions
Viral Skin Diseases
Additional Skin Conditions
Quizzes
Quizzes
Happiness - Test your emotional IQ
Superfoods - Are you eating enough?



Fat and Fats - What do you know about fat?
Skin Pictures - Can you identify these conditions?
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - What do you know about CFS?
Conditions
Diseases & Conditions
Conditions A-Z
Procedures A-Z
Allergies
Alzheimer's
Arthritis
Asthma
Blood Pressure
Cancer
Cholesterol
Chronic Pain
Cold & Flu
Depression
Diabetes
Digestion
Eyesight
Health & Living
Healthy Kids
Hearing & Ear
Heart
HIV/AIDS
Infectious Disease
Lung Conditions
Menopause
Men's Health
Mental Health
Migraine
Neurology
Oral Health
Pregnancy
Senior Health
Sexual Health
Skin Problems
Sleep
Thyroid
Travel Health
Women's Health
Symptom Checker
Health & Living
Health & Living
Diet & Weight Management
Exercise & Fitness
Nutrition, Food & Recipes
Prevention & Wellness
Medications
Medications
Supplements and Vitamins
search
GO
October 15, 2015

Like Us
Follow Us
About Us
Newsletter
Home
Slideshow
Pictures
Slideshow Pictures
All Slideshows
Newest Slideshows
Pet Health Slideshows
Featured Slideshow

Sexual Health


Surprising Health Benefits of Sex


View Slideshow »


Image
Collection
Image Collection (categories)
Allergic Skin Disorders
Bacterial Skin Diseases
Bites and Infestations
Diseases of Pigment
Fungal Skin Diseases
Medical Anatomy and Illustrations
Noncancerous, Precancerous & Cancerous Tumors
Oral Health Conditions
Papules, Scales, Plaques and Eruptions
Scalp, Hair and Nails
Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)
Vascular, Lymphatic and Systemic Conditions
Viral Skin Diseases
Additional Skin Conditions
Featured Image

Picture of Psoriasis


A reddish, scaly rash often located over the surfaces of the elbows, knees, scalp, and around or in the ears, navel, genitals or buttocks...


View Image Gallery »


Quizzes
See All Quizzes (119)
Happiness - Test your emotional IQ
Superfoods - Are you eating enough?
Fat and Fats - What do you know about fat?
Skin Pictures - Can you identify these conditions?
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - What do you know about CFS?
Featured Quiz

Take the Sex & Love Quiz!


The brain. The body. The bedroom. What do you know?


View Quiz »


Diseases
& Conditions
Topic Centers
Conditions A-Z
Procedures A-Z
Allergies
Alzheimer's
Arthritis
Asthma
Blood Pressure
Cancer
Cholesterol
Chronic Pain
Cold & Flu
Depression
Diabetes
Digestion
Eyesight
Health & Living
Healthy Kids
Hearing & Ear
Heart
HIV/AIDS
Infectious Disease
Lung Conditions
Menopause
Men's Health
Mental Health
Migraine
Neurology
Oral Health
Pregnancy
Senior Health
Sexual Health
Skin Problems
Sleep
Thyroid
Travel Health
Women's Health
Symptom
Checker
Health
& Living
Health & Living
Diet & Weight Management
Exercise & Fitness
Nutrition, Food & Recipes
Prevention & Wellness
Featured Topic

Weight Loss


The No-Diet Approach


Learn More »


Medications
Medications
Supplements and Vitamins
MedTerms
Dictionary
Pet
Health

home > depressed preschoolers show brain changes, scans article


Depressed Preschoolers Show Brain Changes, Scans Find

MONDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- A brain region that processes emotions works differently in preschoolers with depression than in those without the mental health disorder, a new study shows.

The findings could lead to ways to identify and treat depressed children earlier in the course of the illness, potentially preventing problems later in life, according to the researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

"The findings really hammer home that these kids are suffering from a very real disorder that requires treatment," lead author Michael Gaffrey, an assistant professor of psychiatry, said in a university news release.

"We believe this study demonstrates that there are differences in the brains of these very young children and that they may mark the beginnings of a lifelong problem," he added.

The researchers used functional MRI to assess brain activity in 54 children, aged 4 to 6, including 23 who had been diagnosed with depression. None of the children in the study had taken antidepressant medications.

The children with depression had elevated activity in the amygdala, a part of the brain that processes emotions, according to the study, published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

Previous research found similar changes in the amygdala in adults, adolescents and older children with depression.

While in the fMRI scanner, the children were shown pictures of people with happy, sad, fearful and neutral facial expressions.

"The amygdala region showed elevated activity when the depressed children viewed pictures of people's faces," Gaffrey said. "We saw the same elevated activity, regardless of the type of faces the children were shown. So it wasn't that they reacted only to sad faces or to happy faces, but every face they saw aroused activity in the amygdala."

-- Robert Preidt