Info for patients about diseases and medications. Health articles, problems and news
Persistence Is Key to Losing Weight and Keeping It Off
Medical news

Losing weight is one of the most common New Year's resolutions, but changing long-held behaviors is a skill in itself, a medical expert says.

To shed unwanted pounds and keep them off, people have to be ready to face some setbacks and keep on trying, said Dr.

 
Poor Sleep May Complicate Young Diabetics' Blood Sugar Control
Medical news

Poor sleep may be undermining the efforts of children with type 1 diabetes when it comes to controlling their blood sugar, new research indicates.

In the study, researchers tracked sleep patterns among 50 kids with type 1 diabetes aged 10 to 16. Compared with similarly aged kids, the children with diabetes were found to be spending more time in a lighter stage of sleep.

 
Power of Acupuncture to Ease Migraines Questioned in Study
Medical news

"Sham" acupuncture worked almost as well on migraine patients as three types of traditional acupuncture, a new study says.

Randomly assigning 480 patients to one of four groups at nine Chinese hospitals -- one sham acupuncture group and three receiving accepted types -- an international team of researchers, including Dr.

 
PTSD, Respiratory Problems May Be Linked in 9/11 Responders
Medical news

Among 9/11 responders at the World Trade Center, the onset of respiratory problems and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) seems to be strongly correlated, with indications that PTSD may lay the groundwork for the development of breathing issues, a new study finds.

 
Researchers Identify Liver Cancer Risk Factors
Medical news

Two new studies from the Mayo Clinic find that hepatitis C infection and obesity could be to blame for a surge in liver cancer cases, which have tripled over the last 30 years.

Late-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), or liver cancer, has only a 10 percent to 12 percent five-year survival rate, according to figures in a Mayo news release.

 
Resolve to Take Colon Cancer Test, Experts Say
Medical news

If you're 50 or older, consider making it a new year goal to get screened for colorectal cancer, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy suggests.

Colorectal cancer is one of the most preventable cancers because most cases arise from precancerous growths in the colon called polyps.

 
Safety Tips for Cold-Weather Exercise
Medical news

If you exercise outdoors in cold weather, you need to take certain steps to stay safe, an expert advises.

The main issue is hypothermia, which is excessive loss of body heat, explained Dr. Cedric X. Bryant, chief science officer at the American Council on Exercise.

 
Scientists Create First Monkeys With Mixed Genomes
Medical news

By gluing together cells from different genomes to form mixed embryos, researchers revealed they have created the world's first chimeric monkeys.

In the report published online and in the Jan. 20 issue of Cell, they said the monkeys, who are made up of as many as six different genomes, are normal and healthy.

 
'Silent Strokes' Linked to Memory Loss in Elderly: Study
Medical news

In some cases, memory loss among the elderly may be due to so-called "silent strokes," new research suggests.

Such strokes, which may not cause any noticeable symptoms, result in small pockets of dead brain cells, and are found in roughly 25 percent of older adults, the study team noted.

 
Spinal Manipulation, Home Exercise May Ease Neck Pain
Medical news

Spinal manipulation and home exercise are more effective at relieving neck pain in the long term than medications, according to new research.

People undergoing spinal manipulation therapy for neck pain also reported greater satisfaction than people receiving medication or doing home exercises.

 
Study Looks at Deep Brain Stimulation in Bipolar Patients
Medical news

A small study suggests that deep brain stimulation, which is currently being investigated as a treatment for general depression, may also help patients with bipolar disorder.

There are some caveats. The surgery necessary to allow deep brain stimulation is extremely expensive.

 
Study Reveals Who's More Prone to Be a 'Mean Drunk'
Medical news

People who lack the ability to consider the future consequences of their current actions are more likely to be aggressive when they're drunk, a new study indicates.

"People who focus on the here and now, without thinking about the impact on the future, are more aggressive than others when they are sober, but the effect is magnified greatly when they're drunk," study author Brad Bushman, a professor of communication and psychology at Ohio State University, said in a university news release.


"If you carefully consider the consequences of your actions, it is unlikely getting drunk is going to make you any more aggressive than you usually are," he added.

The study included 495 adults with an average age of 23 who were social drinkers. They were given a test to determine their ability to think about the future impact of their current actions.

The participants then received either mixed drinks with a 1:5 ratio of alcohol/orange juice (alcohol group) or drinks that had orange juice with a tiny amount of alcohol (placebo group).

Aggression in both groups was assessed using computer-based speed reaction tests in which the participants believed they were competing against other people. The winner gave a harmless, but somewhat painful electric shock, to the loser. The winner determined the length and intensity of the shock.

There were no actual opponents. The researchers controlled the outcomes and increased the intensity and length of the electric shocks received by the participants to assess their level of retaliation.

"The less people thought about the future, the more likely they were to retaliate, but especially when they were drunk. People who were present-focused and drunk shocked their opponents longer and harder than anyone else in the study," Bushman said.

"Alcohol didn't have much effect on the aggressiveness of people who were future-focused," he added.

Men were more aggressive than women overall, but members of both genders who were "here and now" focused grew progressively more retaliatory when intoxicated.

The study appears online and in a future print issue of the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

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Pneumonia Vaccine Approved for Older People
Medical news

The Prevnar 13 bacterial pneumonia vaccine has been approved for people aged 50 and older, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said.

The vaccine targets pneumonia and other diseases caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. The shot, targeting 13 serotypes of the bacterium, has already been approved for children aged 6 weeks through 5 years to prevent invasive disease and certain ear infections, the agency said in a news release.

 
Potential Herpes Vaccine Disappoints Researchers
Medical news

A potential vaccine for genital herpes has shown only limited effectiveness in thwarting one type of the sexually transmitted virus and no ability to stop a second type from spreading, a new study shows.

A group of American and Canadian researchers conducted a randomized trial on more than 8,300 women aged 18 to 30 who tested negative for both forms of the herpes simplex virus, known as HSV-1 and HSV-2.

 
PSA Test for Prostate Cancer Doesn't Save Lives: Study
Medical news

Annual screening for prostate cancer doesn't save lives, finds a new study that is unlikely to quell the controversy surrounding routine prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening.

"Organized prostate cancer screening when done in addition to whatever background testing exists in the population does not result in any apparent benefit, but does result in harm from false positives and over-diagnosis," said lead researcher Philip Prorok, from the Division of Cancer Prevention at the U.

 
Race, Gender, Dementia May Affect Parkinson's Survival
Medical news

Men appear more likely to die from Parkinson's disease than women, Hispanics and Asians with the neurologic disorder, a large U.S. study reveals.

The researchers also found that those patients who suffered from dementia had a higher death rate from Parkinson's disease.

 
Researchers Look at Genomes of Nonsmokers With Lung Cancer
Medical news

Scientists who have started to identify genes and pathways associated with lung cancer in people who have never smoked say it's a first step in the potential development of new treatments.

Never-smokers -- people who've smoked fewer than 100 cigarettes over a lifetime -- account for about 10 percent of lung cancer cases.

 
Risk Factors for Vision Loss After Spine Surgery Identified
Medical news

Researchers have identified six risk factors linked to blindness after spine surgery, a rare but devastating complication.

Known as ischemic optic neuropathy, or ION, the complication occurs when the optic nerve located behind the eyeball is injured.

 
'Safety-First' Playgrounds Linked to Bored, Inactive Kids: Study
Medical news

Remember those tall, shiny, metal, sliding boards? They seemed dauntingly steep, but you took the plunge and whizzed downward. Next, you tackled the monkey bars, climbing higher and higher and hanging by your knees at the pinnacle.

Playgrounds are a lot different for today's preschoolers.

 
Short Delay in Treating Blood Pressure Safe for Diabetics: Study
Medical news

Waiting up to a year to treat high blood pressure in a person with diabetes is probably not harmful, but waiting many years to get blood pressure under control could result in serious complications, new research indicates.

In the study, published online Jan.

 
Smog Tied to Raised Risk of Chronic Illness in Black Women
Medical news

Air pollution may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure in black American women, a new study suggests.

Previous research has shown that air pollution boosts the chances of acute cardiovascular events such as stroke and heart attack, but it hasn't been known whether it also increases the likelihood of chronic diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure (hypertension).

 
Statins May Boost Diabetes Risk in Older Women
Medical news

Statin medications used by women after menopause appear to increase their risk of developing diabetes, according to a large, new study.

The research echoes findings of other studies linking the cholesterol-lowering drugs with an increased diabetes risk in men and women.

 
Study Offers Clues to Why Some Don't Benefit From Asthma Drugs
Medical news

Almost half of patients with mild or moderate asthma may have a different type of disease than those with more severe symptoms, perhaps explaining why common treatments don't work well for them, new research suggests.

"We are beginning to understand that different 'flavors' of asthma probably have different molecular mechanisms," said Dr.

 
Surgery Seems Most Effective for Herniated Discs
Medical news

Married people benefit most from surgery for herniated spinal discs, according to a new study.

And, overall, researchers found that surgery is more effective than nonsurgical treatment options for herniated discs.

In the new study published in the Jan.

 
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